Elysium Health’s Basis – How It Works, Who’s Behind It, and More


There are tons of supplements are available in health food stores, outlets dedicated wholly to dietary and lifestyle supplements, supermarkets, and e-commerce retailers. While many of them provide some benefit – in general, a very limited level of positive results directly related to a particular supplement’s use – few supplements have been proven to yield positive results. As such, it’s misleading for supplement manufacturers to label or market their products as having benefits when they haven’t undergone clinical trials or have been researched thoroughly enough to have their claims substantiated.

Elysium Health is different than many other supplement manufacturers, researchers, and marketers, as their sole product – Basis – has been proven to work thanks to a clinical trial that was conducted earlier this year.

Basis is made up of six ingredients, three of which are found in the capsule that contains the powdered ingredients inside. The central ingredient is nicotinamide riboside, a chemical substance that creates nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide once it’s processed by the human body. Basis’ secondarily active ingredient is pterostilbene, a sirtuin activator that only works in the direct presence of NAD+ (short for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide), although the positive sign indicates that it has a positive charge, in this case having two extra electrons.

Silica is also found within each capsule of Basis, and is intended to lengthen the life of the supplement. The three ingredients that make up each capsule, the barriers between the powdered active ingredients, including silica, plus microcrystalline cellulose, vegetable magnesium stearate, and hypromellose.

Although Basis has not been evaluated by the United States Food and Drug Administration, the oversight organization that deals with the testing and potential approval of medications used in the United States, Basis has, in fact, been subject to a clinical trial.

Funded by Elysium Health themselves, the clinical trial sought out to see if taking a combination of nicotinamide riboside and pterostilbene, 250 and 50 milligrams of each, respectively, would increase the blood serum concentrations of NAD+.

As the scientists and business people confident enough in the assumptions made about the combination’s benefits thought, the above mixture of nicotinamide riboside and pterostilbene increased NAD+. To maintain a steady level of NAD+ over periods of time, simply taking them on a daily basis would suffice.

Each of the 120 people that participated in the trial weren’t certain if they were taking a placebo, one-half dose of Basis’ equivalent ingredients – Elysium Health recommends healthy adults take two capsules per day – or a full dose of Basis’ equivalent. The results indicated that, in participants that took 250 milligrams of nicotinamide riboside and 50 milligrams of pterostilbene on a daily regimen for at least 28 days, participants’ average levels of NAD+ rose 40 percent. Participants that took twice the above amount saw, on average, their levels of NAD+ rise 90 percent.